Personal Introductions


Personal Introductions, Spoken TIE A1-B1
Task Personal introductions; conversation and questions about personal life and interests
Task type Unprepared
Task description The Interlocutor invites Candidates to introduce themselves. Candidates listen to the interlocutor, answer questions and exchange personal information.
Materials None
Sample questions • What’s your name? Where are you from?
• Where do you study?
• What are your favourite hobbies?
• Please ask each other a question.
• Tell us a few things about your family.
• What did you do last weekend?

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

This is the first step of the Spoken TIE examination and gives time for the Candidates to relax and to get to know each other and the Interlocutor.

Candidates should be encouraged to practise talking with others in conversation in a natural way and be ready to answer questions about themselves and their interests.

Topics at all levels are listed in A1, A2 and B1 Unit Specifications.



Presentation of Investigation


The Investigation, Spoken TIE A1-B1
Task Presentation/discussion on project work
Task type Prepared (Candidates have selected a topic which they have researched and included in the logbook, supported with visuals)
Task description Candidates bring their investigations they have prepared and present them for approximately two minutes, then answer questions and discuss the content/visuals included in their investigation.
Materials The project work carried out by the Candidates
Sample projects • My favourite hobby
• A place I love to visit
• My top 3 football players
• The Eurovision Song Contest

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

The Candidate needs to prepare an investigation or mini-project, on a topic of personal interest. Teachers should provide guidance to Candidates about topics appropriate for the level, using the tables in A1, A2 and B1 Unit Specifications.

The investigation will consist of a title, one or more visuals and some text about the topic. Teachers may guide Candidates to relevant sources of information about the topic of the investigation, where Candidates will be reading and/or listening.

The Candidate may choose any topic he/she prefers. Course books which have topic-based units may be useful to inspire Candidates to choose. Teachers can ask Candidates to prepare their project using ideas, vocabulary, etc. covered in the course of study, according to the students’ interests, e.g. the topic ‘Sports’ may be covered in class, which could lead to individual Candidates choosing topics such as ‘Ronaldo’, ‘Formula 1’, ‘Handball’, etc.

Where Candidates find difficulty with choosing their own investigation topic, course book contents may be included, supplemented with one or more visuals.

The Candidate needs to be able to present his/her project for at least two minutes and the answer the Interlocutor and co-Candidate’s questions. They should also be able to ask at least one question to his/her partner about his/her project.

In class, the Candidates can practise presenting their investigations, asking questions and discuss each other’s projects. If this procedure is followed, there is no need for extra time to prepare and practise the projects and Candidates are provided with extra opportunities for interactive communication.

Teachers may start to prepare Candidates from the beginning of their course of study by incorporating project work into the classwork and homework, practising presentations and discussions throughout the programme. In this way, Candidates may have many projects to choose from and are more motivated to talk about a topic which they have found interesting.

Teachers should not prepare investigations/projects to provide to Candidates ready-made. Although the projects are not assessed (the Candidates’ presentation and performance is assessed), the Candidates should prepare their projects independently.

Suitable subject areas to consider in selecting a topic for the project for Candidates at each level can be found in A1, A2 and B1 Unit Specifications.




Presentation of Book


The Book, Spoken TIE A1-B1
Task Presentation / discussion on a book or graded reader (both A1-B1)
Task type Prepared (Candidates have selected a book / graded reader of their choice)
Task description Candidates must be able to talk about their book for approximately 2 minutes, describing the type of book, telling the story, describing the characters, the front cover, explaining the themes of the book etc., then answer the Interlocutor’s questions. The other Candidate is asked to listen, comment and ask one or two questions of their own.
Materials The book
Sample projects • What is the book about?
• Where does it take place?
• Why did you choose this book?
• Did you enjoy reading your book?
• Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why/why not?
• Can you describe the main character in the book?
• Would you like to read another book by the same author? Why/why not?

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

Candidates can choose a book on any topic they prefer (not a magazine or course book) and they should be encouraged to select the book in plenty of time before the examination session, to allow as much time as possible for reading and preparation. Where Candidates find it difficult to select a suitable book, a teacher may provide them with one, or provide them with a choice of pre-selected titles. This may be more appropriate at the A1-B1 levels, where Graded Readers can be supplied.

Candidates should be encouraged to bring their book into class and be prepared to speak about it, alongside listening to other Candidates practising their own presentations, in order to comment on and ask the other Candidates a number of questions.

Many books are also available as audio books, which Candidates may find useful to listen to. Similarly, if a film of the book is available, Candidates should be encouraged to watch it. Listening to audios or watching films of a book may encourage and enable some Candidates to choose a book to read that is above their level, although please note, this does not exempt them from reading the book. Candidates are not assessed on the accuracy of their knowledge of the book content; they are assessed on how well they use their language skills in the book tasks.

Candidates need to practise presenting their book for approximately two minutes and to answer questions from the Interlocutor and other Candidates. They should therefore listen to other Candidates practising their book presentations and practise asking questions.

Candidates may cover a range of relevant content in their presentation, such as the plot of the book, characters, the ending, the type of story, any images on the cover of the book etc.

Candidates should be encouraged to consider reading their book as a ‘reading for pleasure’ activity. Teachers may start to prepare Candidates from the beginning of their course of study by incorporating reading for pleasure into the classwork and homework, practising presentations about books of interest and promoting discussions about books, stories, and other types of reading texts throughout the programme. In this way, Candidates may have many books to choose from and are more motivated to talk about a book they have found interesting.

Teachers should not permit a whole class to use the same book.

Candidates and teachers should be reminded that the examinations are taken with Candidates in pairs and the Candidates may not necessarily know each other. They should therefore be mindful to choose an appropriate book which does not contain sensitive images, events or content which could cause offence or upset to others.

Suitable topics and subject areas to consider in selecting a book for Candidates at each level can be found in A1, A2 and B1 Unit Specifications.




Describing Photographs


The Photo Task, Spoken TIE A1-B1
Task Describing photos
Task type Unprepared
Task description The Interlocutor will present a topic and provide Candidates with a set of photos. Candidates must describe their photos and answer the Interlocutor’s questions.
Materials Visual images presented by the Interlocutor
Sample projects • What can you see in the picture?
• Where are the people in the picture?
• How are they feeling?
A2 and B1 Candidates will be encouraged to share personal experiences and/or provide brief explanations in response to questions leading from the description of the picture. These may involve:
• How the picture makes them feel, and why
• When they have been in similar places / situations, and what happened
• What they would do if they were in the place / situation in the picture, and why.

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

At levels A1–B1, this step of the examination is unprepared.

Candidates should be encouraged to practise talking about and describing a variety of pictures in a natural way and be ready to answer questions about the images.


Example questions:


  • • What can you see in the picture?
  • • Where are the people in the picture?
  • • How are they feeling?

A2 and B1 Candidates should be encouraged to share personal experiences and/or provide brief explanations in response to questions leading from the description of the picture. These may involve:


  • • How the picture makes them feel, and why.
  • • When they have been in similar places / situations, and what happened.
  • • What they would do if they were in the place / situation in the picture and why.

Suitable topics to use in practicing the picture tasks for Candidates at each level can be found in in A1, A2 and B1 Unit Specifications.



Prepared Writing Task


Writing Task, Written TIE A1-B1
Task Completing a form
Task type Prepared (Candidates are informed that the task will be a form to complete, but are unaware of the context).
Task description The Candidate must complete a form with simple and more complex features.The Candidate must follow the instructions to fill in the form, which is in three sections. Section 1 of the form contains personal information. Section 2 of the form contains a series of short questions. Section 3 of the form requires the Candidate to write two or three extended answers in full sentences.
Materials None
Sample projects • Job application form
• Sports school membership form
• Library survey form
• Application to join a new class

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

At A1–B1 levels, this step of the examination consists of completing a form.

Candidates should be encouraged to learn how to complete simple and more complex forms. A variety of form types may appear (e.g. survey form, an application form, an enquiry form).

Candidates should practise following standard instructions on forms to record their personal information accurately (name, date of birth, address, telephone number, etc.) and practise writing some simple sentences about their likes, dislikes, daily life and experience.

The final section of the form allows opportunities for Candidates at the higher level of the band (i.e. A2 and B1) to provide more detailed answers to questions relating to the purpose of the form (2-3 sentence answers).

Teachers may wish to create their own forms for Candidates to practise, or use a range of authentic forms where these are available in English. Forms on English-language websites can also provide a good source of practise items for Candidates to practise completing in class.



Unprepared Writing Task


Writing Task, Written TIE A1-B1
Task Written Composition
Task type Unprepared
Task description The Candidate must write a composition in response to one from a choice of two questions. The first option primarily gives opportunities for Candidates at the lower level of the band (i.e. A1/A2) to demonstrate their written skills. The second question primarily gives opportunities for Candidates at the higher level of the band (i.e. A2/B1) to demonstrate their written skills.
At A1-B1, the Candidate must produce a note, letter, postcard or email.
• A1: 40-70 words
• A2: 60-100 words
• B1: 90-150 words
Materials None
Sample projects • A note to a family member
• An email to a friend
• A letter to your teacher
• A postcard from your holiday

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

Candidates should practise writing a range of texts in class, including letters and emails, postcards and notes.

The types of written texts can be integrated into reading and writing activities in classwork and homework throughout the course of study.

Candidates should be encouraged to practise writing a range of texts to express different functions, on topics appropriate for the level they are working at. Suitable topics and functions for each level are listed in A1, A2 and B1 Unit Specifications.

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