Personal Introductions


Personal Introductions, Spoken TIE B2-C2
Task Personal introductions; conversation and questions about personal life and interests
Task type Unprepared
Task description The Interlocutor invites Candidates to introduce themselves. Candidates listen to the interlocutor, answer questions and exchange personal information.
Materials None
Sample questions • What’s your name? Where are you from?
• Where do you study?
• What are your favourite hobbies?
• Please ask each other a question.
• Tell us a few things about your family.
• What did you do last weekend?
• What was the best birthday present you have ever received?
• What would you do if you won £1000?

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

This is the first step of the Spoken TIE examination and gives time for the Candidates to relax and to get to know each other and the Interlocutor.

Candidates should be encouraged to practise talking with others in conversation in a natural way and be ready to answer questions about themselves and their interests.

Topics at levels are listed in B2, C1 and C2 Unit Specifications.



Presentation of Investigation


The Investigation, Spoken TIE B2-C2
Task Presentation/discussion on project work
Task type Prepared (Candidates have selected a topic which they have researched and included in the logbook, supported with visuals)
Task description Candidates bring their investigations they have prepared and present them for approximately two minutes, then answer questions and discuss the content/visuals included in their investigation.
Materials The project work carried out by the Candidates
Sample projects • My favourite hobby
• A place I love to visit
• My top 3 football players
• The Eurovision Song Contest
• The ethical treatment of animals

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

The Candidate needs to prepare an investigation, or mini-project, on a topic of personal interest. Teachers should provide guidance to Candidates about topics appropriate for the level, using the tables in B2, C1 and C2 Unit Specifications.

The investigation will consist of a title, one or more visuals and some text about the topic. Teachers may guide Candidates to relevant sources of information about the topic of the investigation, where Candidates will be reading and/or listening.

The Candidate may choose any topic he/she prefers. Course books which have topic-based units may be useful to inspire Candidates to choose. Teachers can ask Candidates to prepare their project using ideas, vocabulary, etc. covered in the course of study, according to the students’ interests, e.g. the topic ‘Sports’ may be covered in class, which could lead to individual Candidates choosing topics such as ‘Ronaldo’, ‘Formula 1’, ‘Handball’, etc.

Where Candidates find difficulty with choosing their own investigation topic, course book contents may be included, supplemented with one or more visuals.

The Candidate needs to be able to present his/her project for at least two minutes and the answer the Interlocutor and co-Candidate’s questions. They should also be able to ask at least one question to his/her partner about his/her project.

In class, the Candidates can practise presenting their investigations, asking questions and discuss each other’s projects. If this procedure is followed, there is no need for extra time to prepare and practise the projects and Candidates are provided with extra opportunities for interactive communication.

Teachers may start to prepare Candidates from the beginning of their course of study by incorporating project work into the classwork and homework, practising presentations and discussions throughout the programme. In this way, Candidates may have many projects to choose from and are more motivated to talk about a topic which they have found interesting.

Teachers should not prepare investigations/projects to provide to Candidates ready-made. Although the projects are not assessed (the Candidates’ presentation and performance is assessed), the Candidates should prepare their projects independently.

Suitable subject areas to consider in selecting a topic for the project for Candidates at each level can be found in B2, C1 and C2 Unit Specifications.



Presentation of News Story


The News Story, Spoken and Written TIE B2-C2
Task Presentation / discussion on a news story
And Writing about the news story
Task type Prepared (Candidates have followed a news story of their choice, using at least two media sources, e.g. newspaper and the internet).
Task description Candidates must be able to talk about the news story for at least 2 minutes and then answer the Interlocutor’s questions. The other Candidate is asked to listen, comment and ask one or two questions of their own.
Candidates are also expected to be able to write about the news story in the Written TIE.
Materials Candidates’ news stories, recorded in the logbook.
Sample projects • What attracted you to this story?
• What happened before that has led to the events you described?
• What do you think has happened to the people/place/event since your news story was published?
• What sources did you use?
• Which were the easiest/most difficult to follow?
• What have you learned from this story?

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

Each Candidate must choose and follow a recent news story of their choice (no more than 6 months old). At least two sources of news must be used, which may include newspaper reports (from local or national newspapers), magazine articles, online news sites, etc.

Candidates should practise presenting their news story to their teacher and others in the class and practise speaking and writing about it, alongside listening to other Candidates practising their own presentations, in order to comment on and ask the other Candidates a number of questions. Candidates should be encouraged to practise writing the answers to written questions from other Candidates and the teacher.

Candidates choosing a topical news story may also use visual news, such as that online or on television, where this can be accessed in English, e.g. BBC news, CNN news, Euronews. Candidates may find audio / visual versions of the news story useful to listen to or watch and this can be encouraged. Listening to audios or watching TV news in English about the news story may encourage and enable some Candidates to choose a news story to read that is above their level. Please note, this does not exempt them from reading the news story. Candidates are not assessed on the accuracy of their knowledge of the news story content, nor on their opinions; they are assessed on how well they use their language skills in the news story tasks.

Candidates need to practise presenting their news story and answering questions about it. They should therefore listen to other Candidates practising their news story presentations and practise asking questions. Presentations of the news story are expected to last for approximately two minutes.

Candidates may cover a range of relevant content in their presentation, such as the sources they have used, the story itself, who has been affected by the story, how the story has been presented in the media etc.

Candidates should be encouraged to consider reading the news as a ‘reading for pleasure’ activity and encouraged to choose a news story appropriate to their age and interests. Teachers may start to prepare Candidates from the beginning of their course of study by incorporating listening to the news, reading about topical issues or current affairs and helping to prepare Candidates in how to ‘follow’ a news story, where discussion can evolve as news stories develop in the media. Reading magazines and newspapers can be integrated into classwork and homework. In this way, Candidates may have many news stories to choose from and are more motivated to talk about a news story they have followed with interest.

Candidates and teachers should be reminded that the examinations are taken with Candidates in pairs and the Candidates may not know each other. They should therefore be mindful to choose an appropriate news story which does not contain sensitive images, events or content which could cause offence or upset to others.

Suitable topics to use in selecting a news story for Candidates at each level can be found in B2, C1 and C2 Unit Specifications.




Presentation of Book


The Book, Spoken TIE B2-C2
Task Presentation / discussion on a book or graded reader and Writing about the book
Task type Prepared (Candidates have selected a book / graded reader of their choice)
Task description Candidates must be able to talk about their book for at least 2 minutes, describing the type of book, telling the story, describing the characters, the front cover, explaining the themes of the book etc., then answers the Interlocutor’s questions. The other Candidate is asked to listen, comment and ask one or two questions of their own.
Candidates are also expected to be able to write about the book in the Written TIE.
Materials The book
Sample projects • What is the book about?
• Where does it take place?
• Why did you choose this book?
• Did you enjoy reading your book?
• Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why/why not?
• Can you describe the main character in the book?
• Would you like to read another book by the same author? Why/why not?

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

Candidates can choose a book on any topic they prefer (not a magazine or course book) and they should be encouraged to select the book in plenty of time before the examination session, to allow as much time as possible for reading and preparation. Where Candidates find it difficult to select a suitable book, a teacher may provide them with one, or provide them with a choice of pre-selected titles.

Candidates should be encouraged to bring their book into class and be prepared to speak about it, alongside listening to other Candidates practising their own presentations, in order to comment on and ask the other Candidates a number of questions.

Candidates should also be encouraged to practise writing about the book and to practise writing the answers to others’ questions.

Many books are also available as audio books, which Candidates may find useful to listen to. Similarly, if a film of the book is available, Candidates should be encouraged to watch it. Listening to audios or watching films of a book may encourage and enable some Candidates to choose a book to read that is above their level, although please note, this does not exempt them from reading the book. Candidates are not assessed on the accuracy of their knowledge of the book content; they are assessed on how well they use their language skills in the book tasks.

Candidates need to practise presenting their book for at least two minutes and to answer questions from the Interlocutor and other Candidates. They should therefore listen to other Candidates practising their book presentations and practise asking questions.

Candidates may cover a range of relevant content in their presentation, such as the plot of the book, characters, the ending, the type of story, any images on the cover of the book etc.

Candidates should be encouraged to consider reading their book as a ‘reading for pleasure’ activity. Teachers may start to prepare Candidates from the beginning of their course of study by incorporating reading for pleasure into the classwork and homework, practising presentations about books of interest and promoting discussions about books, stories, and other types of reading texts throughout the programme. In this way, Candidates may have many books to choose from and are more motivated to talk about a book they have found interesting.

Teachers should not permit a whole class to use the same book.

Candidates and teachers should be reminded that the examinations are taken with Candidates in pairs and the Candidates may not necessarily know each other. They should therefore be mindful to choose an appropriate book which does not contain sensitive images, events or content which could cause offence or upset to others.

Suitable topics and subject areas to consider in selecting a book for Candidates at each level can be found in B2, C1 and C2 Unit Specifications.




Decision-MakingTask


The Decision Making Task, Spoken TIE B2-C2
Task Problem-solving interaction based on visual materials
Task type Unprepared
Task description The Interlocutor will present a topic and a question and provide Candidates with a series of photos, representing a range of options
Candidates must engage in conversation between themselves, expressing their opinions, agreeing or disagreeing, making suggestions, expressing preferences and reach a conclusion, presenting the conclusion to the Interlocutor with their reasons.
The Interlocutor may broaden the topic, prompting further discussion.
Materials Visual images presented by the Interlocutor
Sample Questions • A range of hobbies: which one is most enjoyable?
• Holiday homes: which is the best holiday accommodation?
• How are they feeling?
• A selection of animals: which one would make the best pet?
• Sports: which are the best to maintain fitness?

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

At levels B2-C2, this step of the examination is unprepared.

Candidates should be encouraged to interact with each other in a natural way and be ready to agree and disagree, share their opinions, express preferences, make suggestions, take turns and come to an agreement, giving reasons for their conclusion.


Example questions:


In this task, the exchange of information is more important than reaching an agreement. Many Candidates may feel that, in this kind of problem-solving or decision making task, there is pressure on them to reach an agreed solution or conclusion as quickly as possible. In this task, the emphasis is on the process by which the agreement or conclusion is reached rather than the result itself.


Candidates can practise in pairs, or in small groups, in the classroom, with a teacher broadening the topic as Candidates gain the relevant skills, to prompt further discussion between Candidates.


Suitable topics to use in practising decision making tasks for Candidates at each level can be found in B2, C1 and C2 Unit Specifications.



Unprepared Writing Task


Writing Task, Written TIE B2-C2
Task Written Composition
Task type Unprepared
Task description The Candidate must write a composition in response to one from a choice of two questions. The first option primarily gives opportunities for Candidates at the lower level of the band (B2/C1) to demonstrate their written skills. The second question primarily gives opportunities for Candidates at the higher level of the band (C1/C2) to demonstrate their written skills.
The Candidate must write a letter, essay, article, story or a review
• B2: 150-200 words
• C1 & C2: over 190 words
Materials None
Sample Questions • An email to a friend
• A letter to your teacher
• A postcard from your holiday
• An article for a newspaper or magazine
• A review of a film, book or event
• A letter to a company

Preparation Guidance for Teachers and Candidates

Candidates should practise writing a range of texts in class, including letters and emails, postcards and notes at the lower levels, and letters, essays, stories, articles and reviews at the higher levels.

The types of written texts can be integrated into reading and writing activities in classwork and homework throughout the course of study, to enable Candidates to become familiar with the text types, common formats and standard phrasing and grammar expected in texts of differing levels of formality. The functions of writing should also be practised: writing to describe, give information, give advice, thank someone, complain, give opinions, etc. can all be practised in classwork and homework, integrated into the programme of study.

Candidates should be encouraged to practise writing a range of texts to express different functions, on topics appropriate for the level they are working at. Suitable topics and functions for each level are listed in B2, C1 and C2 Unit Specifications.

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